Because students matter . . .

                                         Because what we do in our courses matters . . .

                                         Because the university is not an ivory tower . . .

            Teaching badly is no longer an ethical alternative.  Students arrive at institutions of higher education in desperate need of our help in finding a place in the world and in better understanding how to navigate their personal and public roles. The societies we inhabit need workers and citizens with a rich understanding of the world around them. And our classrooms have become a central location for the war against inequality which is spreading across the globe.

            More than ever before, the tools that we need to achieve these goals are available to us. For the last two decades I have had the good fortune to be part of a marvelous conversation about how to make higher education a place where the needs of our students and our societies are at last truly met. In this blog I would like to pass on some of what I have learned and to make a space for your thoughts as well.  Please join in this great endeavor

Blog Posts

Left Hand, Right Hand

     In the two decades of my life between kindergarten and completing course work for my Ph.D., I had dedicated teachers from whom I learned a great deal.  But I cannot consciously identify a single thing from their pedagogies that I have actually taken into my current teaching. My childhood...

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The Shame Factories of Academia

              The look of utter horror on the faces of my luncheon companions was only visible for an instant, before they reestablished their habitual control over their emotions.  But in that moment the terror that my words had inspired was unmistakably visible.             I had, quite unintentionally, produced this effect...

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Beyond the Autopsy

            Several years ago in a workshop in Liverpool, Gregor Novak, the founder of Just-in-Time Teaching, commented that in most courses the final exam is like an autopsy – it does no good for those students who are already “dead.” It could be argued that the traditional final is even...

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