Because students matter . . .

                                         Because what we do in our courses matters . . .

                                         Because the university is not an ivory tower . . .

            Teaching badly is no longer an ethical alternative.  Students arrive at institutions of higher education in desperate need of our help in finding a place in the world and in better understanding how to navigate their personal and public roles. The societies we inhabit need workers and citizens with a rich understanding of the world around them. And our classrooms have become a central location for the war against inequality which is spreading across the globe.

            More than ever before, the tools that we need to achieve these goals are available to us. For the last two decades I have had the good fortune to be part of a marvelous conversation about how to make higher education a place where the needs of our students and our societies are at last truly met. In this blog I would like to pass on some of what I have learned and to make a space for your thoughts as well.  Please join in this great endeavor

Blog Posts

Addicted to the Curve

            I have been told that this little story is true.  I have no reason to doubt its accuracy, but its importance lies, not in its historicity, but rather in the fact that it is entirely plausible. And that says a great deal about academia today. . .           Once upon …

Decoding Art Anxiety

Arranging Victories for StudentsConfronted with images like many of those on this page, some students are as confused as I was by the equations of Professor Brown.  But in some ways their situation is worse. Not only do they lack any clear idea of how to solve the "problem" of …

Lost in Lecture

DECODING CULTURAL CAPITAL    “How hard is it to raise one’s hand, to approach an instructor after class, or to come to office hours to discuss a difficult assignment?” Let’s imagine an instructor asking himself this question, sitting alone in his office hours. “Half of these students understood nothing of what …