Because students matter . . .

                                         Because what we do in our courses matters . . .

                                         Because the university is not an ivory tower . . .

            Teaching badly is no longer an ethical alternative.  Students arrive at institutions of higher education in desperate need of our help in finding a place in the world and in better understanding how to navigate their personal and public roles. The societies we inhabit need workers and citizens with a rich understanding of the world around them. And our classrooms have become a central location for the war against inequality which is spreading across the globe.

            More than ever before, the tools that we need to achieve these goals are available to us. For the last two decades I have had the good fortune to be part of a marvelous conversation about how to make higher education a place where the needs of our students and our societies are at last truly met. In this blog I would like to pass on some of what I have learned and to make a space for your thoughts as well.  Please join in this great endeavor

Blog Posts

Amoebas, Sexual Reproduction, and a History Department

            I have spent a significant amount of my life in faculty meetings.  Time that might have been spent in meaningful activity. Hours that will never be returned to me.             But faculty meetings did provide ample occasions for extended reflection on what was going on around me, and thoughts...

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Tear Down This Wall! – Decoding K-16

      We can be as divided by invisible walls as by those made of stone.  They limit our movements and deny us access to all that lies on the other side of the unseen barrier. Those on our side come to constitute humanity; those on the other are something else,...

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Dumb Questions?

     Readers of the February 2017 edition of The History Teacher must have been surprised to see an article by Leah Shopkow with the title “How Many Sources Do I Need?”1 This question is legendary among teachers in the humanities and social sciences.  As soon as a research paper is...

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